Archive for the ‘Media and Entertainment’ Category

Bullseye: NCC Media Helps Advertisers Score a Direct Hit with Their Audiences

Keith Manthey

CTO of Analytics at EMC Emerging Technologies Division

Can you recall the last commercial you watched? If you’re having a hard time remembering, don’t beat yourself up. Nowadays, it’s all too easy for us to fast forward, block or avoid ads entirely. In order to watch content on one of our many devices, advertising is no longer a necessary preccartoon-tv-convertedursor to enjoying our favorite shows. While people may be consuming more media in more places than we’ve ever seen, it’s more challenging than ever for advertisers to reach their target audiences. The rise of media fragmentation and ad-blocking technology has exponentially increased the cost of reaching the same number of people it did years ago.

As a result, advertisers are under pressure to accurately allocate spending across TV and digital media and to ensure those precious ad dollars being spent are reaching the right people. Gone are the days when a media buyer’s gut instinct determined which block of airtime to purchase on what channel, replaced instead with advanced analytics.

By aggregating hundreds of terabytes of data from sources like Nielsen ratings, Scarborough local market data and even voting and census data, companies such as NCC Media are able to provide targeted strategies for major retailers, nonprofits and political campaigns. In one of the most contentious election years to date, AdAge reported data and analytics are heavily influencing how political advertisers are purchasing cable TV spots. According to Tim Kay, director of political strategy at NCC, “Media buyers…are basing TV decisions on information such as whether a program’s audience is more likely to vote or be registered gun owners.”

In order for NCC to identify its customers targets more quickly (for example, matching data about cable audiences to voter information and zip codes targets more quickly), NCC built an enterprise data lake with EMC Isilon’s scale-out storage with Hortonworks Data Platform, allowing it to streamline data aggregation and analytics.

To learn more about how Isilon has helped NCC eliminate time-consuming overnight data importation processes and tackle growing data aggregation requirements, check out the video below or read the NCC Media Case Study.

 

IBC 2016: Takeaways from the Year’s Biggest Broadcast Event

Tom "TV" Burns

CTO, Media & Entertainment at EMC

 

Ah, Amsterdam…famed for its tulip fields, wooden clogs, bicycle rides through the city, and an annual industry gathering that unites more than 55,000 media and entertainment professionals to discuss the challenges and opportunities facing the world of broadcasting.

The International Broadcasting Convention (IBC) is always a great opportunity to connect with our global customers, partners and hear about the major developments taking place in media & entertainment today.

This was my 4th time attending IBC and, as at previous conferences, there was no shortage of exciting product announcements, customer and partnership wins, and spirited discussions about what’s ahead for us in the coming year(s). Here’s a high-level snapshot of the major trends I saw at IBC this year:

hanging-sign

Enterprise IT Shaping M&E’s Migration to IP

We continue to see progress in the migration to all IP workflows, and this evolution is taking shape with lessons from enterprise IT. In an industry where flexibility and agility are key, proprietary media hardware will quickly become a roadblock to the next generation of simplicity.

I had the opportunity to visit the IBC IP Interoperability Zone, which featured more than 30 diverse demos of verified technical interoperability over IP. The new initiative was developed by the Alliance for IP Media Solutions (AIMS) and the International Association of Broadcasting Manufacturers (IABM), with a shared vision (as expressed by Peter White, IABM CEO in an article from SVG) to “remove the roadblock that uncertainty over standards and interoperability has put in the way of end-users’ decisions to transition to the many potential operating and cost benefits of IP technology in the broadcast production chain.”

Potential, not pixels, is what matters

I think the next significant growth area in the M&E space will be around data analytics, particularly in light of how “TV” as we know it has evolved. Further, machine learning (AKA AI or deep learning), is becoming increasingly sophisticated particularly around the areas of video search.

Look at the ways that televisions themselves at been evolving. Even as recently as a few years ago, when it came to buying a TV (or any ”entertainment viewing device,” for that matter), what mattered most was the picture quality. Screens were still relatively large and bulky in size and resolution was often the primary consideration for consumers. Those buying factors have changed, to where we think of TV (again, “entertainment viewing devices”) more as a sophisticated media hub than just a humble television. Long gone are the days of “appointment viewing,” where viewers had a specific day and time to watch a program before it was gone forever. Today the conversation is around USB ports, storage, networking, wireless connectivity and on-demand viewing, just for starters.

In fact, I’d like to designate NHK for “T.V. Burns Top Pick for Best Demo at IBC” for their awe-inspiring 130″ 8K display screen f(made up of 4x4K OLED panels) that was just 2mm thick, including bezel! Talk about taking your next weekend movie night to the next level!

Virtual Reality (VR) Closer to Becoming Actual Reality

VR was everywhere at IBC, with myriad demos, launches and partnerships being announced that will ultimately bring us all one step closer to experiencing true VR. The fact is that the way that consumers experience programming is fast becoming richer and more lifelike than ever. It’s not far-off to say that soon we’ll no longer “watch” TV but rather “experience” it through full video and audio immersion with a 360 view of our content.

Notably at IBC, Kaltura launched the VR Alliance, in conjunction with founding partners Inception, 24i Media, Encompass and Harmonic. The “Future Zone” on the exhibit floor was incredibly popular, with attendees being able to interact with realistic avatars via LiveLike, and an interactive cooking show from BBC R&D (Cook-Along Kitchen Experience, or CAKE) that adjusts the content in real-time to align with the viewer’s cooking.

The World Gets Smaller

Consolidation and partnership were definitely in the air at IBC, with a slew of acquisition announcements coming out around the event. Rovi closed its $1.1B acquisition of TiVo; Blackmagic Design bought both Fairlight and Ultimatte; Ross Video announced the acquisition of Abekas, Inc.; and Telestream announced the acquisition of UK-based Quality Control (QC) technology specialist, Vidcheck. In partnership news, Ericsson and Google joined forces to combine Ericsson’s MediaFirst platform into Google’s Android TV ecosystem.

If you were at IBC – or if you were monitoring developments from home – what were your favorite announcements and developments? Let us know what you think the next year will bring for the M&E space after this year’s event.

Survey findings show close alignment with Dell EMC strategy

Charles Sevior

Chief Technology Officer at EMC Emerging Technologies Division

Media Workflow Trends Survey-  Industry Transformation is Underway

Earlier in 2016, Dell EMC commissioned Gatepoint Research to conduct an extensive survey with Media Industry executives.  The survey, entitled Media Workflow Trends yielded some interesting results that point to a good understanding of the pace of change, and the need to stay agile for competitive advantage.

The results of that survey are summarised in a new Infographic, which apart from being much more interesting than a series of pie charts brings to the surface the key themes that align with the technology development strategy of Dell EMC.

Content Storage Demands Are Exploding

I have worked in the media industry for decades, and so this is hardly a surprising finding.  Early in my career, it was commonplace to find production offices full of shelves and compactus storage units.  These were crammed with videotapes. Then there were boxes stacked everywhere – also full of tapes with titles scrawled on the back.  There were colour-coded stickers – “Master”, “Protection Master”, “Edit Copy”, “HOLD”… There was a warehouse full of tapes of various types, even old films.  One thing you learned, is that nothing was ever thrown away (but plenty of things went missing).

Fast-forward to 2016, and most media companies involved in production and distribution of content have shifted to file-based Media Asset Management systems – or at least a media content archive repository.  This has helped to contain the data sprawl into a central location, but it has done nothing to reduce the total storage capacity requirement.  Think about the increasing resolution of content, the increasing number of channels, multiple versions for different delivery platforms and of course the increasing “shoot to use” ratio.  Sports events have increasing number of cameras with retained ISO recordings for highlights and post-match inquiries, Reality TV formats are based on multi-cam techniques to get every reaction from different angles.  Whilst these programs are in production, the storage capacity demands can skyrocket.

Only 3% of our survey respondents replied that storage needs are flat or negative – and 50% responded that the demand for storage capacity is growing rapidly and a major concern.

Multiplatform Content Delivery

Pretty much every major media company is either doing this already, or has a plan to extend their audience reach beyond simple linear broadcast channels in the next few years.  But what is interesting is the increasingly careful way in which media companies are deploying their solutions.

Recognising that the simple approach of outsourcing multiplatform content delivery to a third-party OVP (Online Video Platform) is not very revenue accretive, Media companies are now starting to embrace DIY in order to pull-back some profit margin in what is otherwise a very difficult to monetise delivery strategy.  As we learn more from some of the leaders in this industry – such as MLBAM – we can see the benefits in taking control and managing as much of the content delivery process end to end.  Just like we always did with linear content delivery over terrestrial RF transmitters, satellite transponders and cable TV networks.

One of the key tips is being ready to scale.  As streaming demand spikes and grows with popular content, how can every incremental viewer bring incremental profit – not just rising CDN costs?  Taking a tip from Netflix, you can build a distributed origin and control the CDN deeper into the delivery network.  Dell EMC has repeatedly partnered with some of the leading solution vendors in this space, who make it easier to deploy a well-managed and profitable multiplatform content delivery system.

IP-Based Workflows are here

Most industry commentators seem to get pretty excited about “the death of SDI”, and how soon IP networking can completely replace the dedicated video & audio circuits of the past.  But really, that is just a side show for which we will soon lose interest.  There is no “right or wrong” way to build a media facility.  The engineers and technical architects will select the appropriate technology on a case by case basis as they always have, based on reliability, quality, cost, ease of management etc.  And over time, there will simply be more connections made using IP network technology and fewer using dedicated single-purpose technology.

But what is the end-game?  I see it as moving our media equipment technology stacks (also known as the “rack room” or “central technical facility”) away from dedicated single-purpose vendor solutions built and managed carefully by Broadcast Engineers into a flexible virtualised technology stack that looks identical to a cloud-scale data centre – built and managed by IT and Media Technologists.  It will be open architecture, built on software-defined principles and capable of easy repurposing as the application technology needs of the business shift more frequently than they did in the past.

It is important to select your partners carefully as you make this transition into IP and software-defined.  Dell EMC has deliberately remained vendor neutral and standards-based.  We have aligned with SMPTE and AIMS who we believe are two organisations that have the broad interests of the industry (both end-users and vendors) at heart, and will result in practical, cost-effective and widely-adopted solutions.

As a pioneer and leader in scale-out storage, virtualisation and converged infrastructure, Dell EMC is in a great position to help you avoid costly mistakes during your transition to IP-based workflows.

EMC-Media and Entertainment-Infographic

Click to see the full M&E trends infographic

Ultra-HD Is Coming

Well, it’s already here.  Of course most people shopping for a new flat screen TV today will see that their options include 4K resolution, and are increasingly affordable when compared to the default HD TV resolution.  Some in the industry will say that 4K is unnecessary and is being pushed by the consumer electronics manufacturers – but when has that ever been a different story in the past?  There is no doubt that consumers appreciate improved quality of content, and story-tellers love the creative opportunities afforded by the latest technology.  When we can finally deliver ALL of the aspects of Ultra-HD, such as HDR (high dynamic range), HFR (high frame rates) and multi-channel surround sound that will be one step closer to reality.

At the SMPTE Future of Cinema Keynote during NAB 2016, pioneering movie Director Ang Lee said;

Technology must work for us to help tell the human story.  Whether it is from 2K to 4K, or 24 to 60fps, it improves the sensory experience and as a viewer, you become more relaxed and less judgmental.  We will always be chasing god’s work – which is the natural vision and sensory experience. We are getting closer and learning more about how we communicate with each other.”

In the world of content creation and media distribution, we will increasingly adopt 4K cameras, render graphics and animations at increased resolution and ensure the product we make has an increased shelf life.  This is natural, even if it is happening before we have an ability to deliver this content to our viewers.  And while it is difficult to “rip and replace” cable, satellite and terrestrial networks that are still only shifting from SD to HD with new 4K solutions, OTT content delivery using internet broadband and mobile networks will probably be the way most consumers first access Ultra-HD.

Dell EMC Isilon is a scale-out storage solution that grows in capacity and bandwidth as more nodes combine into a single-volume multi-tier cluster.  We already have numerous customers using Isilon for 4K editing and broadcast today.  As we constantly innovate and bring new technology to market, we continue to deliver to our customers the benefits of Moore’s Law.  The real key to Isilon technology is the way that we deliver platform innovation in an incremental and backward-compatible way – supporting the ability to scale and grow non-disruptively.

Beyond LTO Archiving

I mentioned earlier in this blog how my early career was defined by shelves and boxes of tapes – videotapes everywhere.  I spent time in my day handling tape, winding tape into cartridges, even editing audio and videotape using a razor blade!  The most important machine in the building (a commercial TV station) was the cart machine.  That was because it held all of the commercial 30 second spots, and if those did not play, the TV station did not make money and we would not get paid.

Finally we replaced cart machines and replay videotape machines with hard disk servers that were highly reliable, fast to respond to late changes and very flexible.  So I wonder when we will say it is time to replace the data tape archive library with a cloud store?  Certainly we are all familiar with and probably daily users of one of the biggest media archives in the world (I refer to Google’s YouTube).  Wouldn’t it be great if your company had its own YouTube?  A content repository that was always online, instantly searchable, growing with fresh material and just as easy to use?

So then we get down to cost.  It turns out, that even though they seem cheap, the cost of actually using a public cloud store for long term retention is a lot more expensive than existing data tape technology – especially as the LTO industry brings innovation beyond LTO-6 into the latest LTO-7 data tape format with 6TB native capacity.

But that migration process to move all of your media from one standard to the next is painful and time-consuming – introducing cost, wear & tear and impacting on end-user search & retrieval times from the library.

From our survey respondents, the top features for consideration of a storage solution are performance, scalable capacity and efficient use of resources (floor space, power, personnel).  So if we took those criteria into account, cloud storage should win hands-down – if only the price was right.

Well finally now it is.  Dell EMC has been developing an innovative product called ECS (Elastic Cloud Storage) which meets all of the requirements of a Modern Archive – scalable, multi-site geo-replication, open architecture, software-defined.  And now it is available in a range of hardware platforms that offer the high packing density of large capacity and very efficient hard drives – today 8TB is supported and clearly that native capacity will grow.

Increasingly customers are asking us whether this technology is price competitive with LTO libraries, and whether it is reliable and ready for mission-critical high-value archives.  The answer to both of these questions is yes, and the benefits of moving to your own cloud store are significant (whether you choose to deploy it within your own premises or have it hosted for you).

Cloud Solutions are gathering converts

When you boil it all down, our industry is in transformation from a legacy & bespoke architecture to that of a cloud. The great thing about a cloud, is that it is flexible and can easily change shape, scale and take on new processes and workloads.  And it doesn’t have to be the public cloud.  It can be “your cloud”.  Or it can be a mix of both – which really gives you the best of both worlds.  Public cloud for burst, private cloud for base load and deterministic performance.

Building clouds and bringing technology innovation to industry is what Dell EMC is really good at.  Speak with us to learn more about how to embark on this journey and the choices available to you.

SUMMARY

So we find that across the media industry the evolution is underway.  This is a multi-faceted transformation.  We are not just switching from “SD to HD”, we are actually evolving at the business, operations, culture and technology level.

Dell EMC is positioned as an open architecture vendor neutral infrastructure provider offering best in class storage, servers, networking, workstations, virtualisation and cloud management solutions.  Engage with us to secure your infrastructure foundation, to be future-ready, and to simplify your technology environment so that you can focus on what really matters to your business – what makes your offering attractive to viewers (on any platform)

 

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Taking AIMS at the IP Transition

Ryan Sayre

Ryan Sayre is the CTO-at-Large for EMC Isilon covering Europe, Middle East, and Africa. Ryan has prior hands-on experience in production technology across several types of production workflows. Previously before working in the storage industry, he was an IT infrastructure architect at a large animation studio in the United States. He has consulted across entertainment sectors from content generation and production management to digital distribution and presentation. Ryan’s current role allows him to assist in enhancing the Isilon product for both current and future uses in media production, share his findings across similar industries and improve the overall landscape of how storage can be better leveraged for productivity. He holds an MBA from London Business School (UK), Bachelors of Science in Computer Science from University of Portland (USA). In his free time, he is an infrastructure volunteer for the London Hackspace and an amateur radio enthusiast using the callsigns M0RYS and N0RYS.

Latest posts by Ryan Sayre (see all)

Much has been made of the impending move to a largely IP and hybrid cloud infrastructure in the media and entertainment industry and with good reason. Over the last decade the shift from SDI to IP has been met with both cheers and jeers. Supporters of transitioning to IP speak of vast operating and financial benefits, while traditional broadcast facilities and operators are still struggling to reconcile these potential gains with their unease over emerging standards and interoperability concerns.

In an effort to assuage these concerns, EMC alongside several of the industry’s leading vendors such as Cisco, Evertz, Imagine Communications and Sony have joined the Alliance for IP Media Solutions (AIMS). AIMS, a non-profit trade alliance, is focused on helping broadcast and media companies move from bespoke legacy systems to a virtualized, IP-based future – quickly and economically. Believing open, standards-based protocol as critically important to ensuring long-term interoperability, AIMS’ promotes the adoption of several standards: VSF TR-03 and TR-04, SMPTE 2022-6 and AES67.

It is important that organizations continue to advocate for AIMS’ roadmap for open standards in IP technology and do their part to educate each other, which is why we recently partnered with TV Technology and Broadcast Television and internet production technology conceptEngineering to develop an e-book titled “The IP Transformation: What It Means for M&E Storage Strategies”. It examines how the combination of standard Ethernet/IP networking, virtualized workflows on commodity servers and clustered high-performance storage is influencing new video facility design and expanding new business opportunities for media companies. The e-book takes a closer look on topics such as media exchange characteristics, the eventual fate of Fibre Channel, Quality of Service (QoS) and storage needs for evolving media workflows.

To learn more about the shift to IP, visit EMC at IBC 2016 at stand 7.H10, September 9-13. The media and entertainment experts will be onsite exhibiting an array of new products and media workflow solutions that include 4K content creation, IP-based hybrid-cloud broadcast operations, and cloud DVR on-demand content delivery. EMC will also be demonstrating a number of partner solutions at IBC, including:

Pixspan, Aspera and NVIDIA

Advances in full resolution 4K workflows – EMC, Pixspan, Aspera, and NVIDIA are bringing full resolution 4K workflows to IT infrastructures, advancing digital media workflows with bit exact content over standard 10 GbE networks. Solution Overview

Imagine Communications

Integrated channel playout solution with Imagine Communications – EMC and Imagine Communications bring live channel playout with the Versio solution in an integrated offering with EMC’s converged VCE Vblock system and EMC’s Isilon scale-out NAS storage system. Solution Overview

MXFserver

Remote and collaborative editing solution with MXFserver –EMC and MXFsever are announcing an integrated disk-based archiving solution that allows immediate online retrieval of media files. The combined solution utilizes MXFserver software and EMC’s Isilon scale-out NAS to deliver storage as well as a platform for industry-leading editing applications. Solution Overview

Anevia

Cloud-based multi-platform content delivery with Anevia – The joint release from Anevia and EMC allows media organizations to deliver OTT Services: Live, Timeshift, Replay, Catchup, Start over, Pause, CDVR, and VOD to provide content to all devices, enabling consumers to access and view content they have recorded on any device at any time. Solution Overview

Rohde & Schwarz

EMC and Rohde & Schwarz announce an interoperability with Isilon storage and the Venice Ingest and Production platform. Venice is a real-time and file-based ingest and playout server from Rohde & Schwarz. Solution Overview

NLTek

EMC and NLTek bring a combined solution enabling integration with Avid Interplay. Working within the familiar Avid MC|UX toolset, users are able to store and restore Avid Assets to an EMC Isilon or ECS media repository—creating a unified Nearchive. Solution Overview

For more information and to schedule a meeting at IBC, please visit our website.

 

 

This summer, NBC captured history while setting standards for the future

Tom "TV" Burns

CTO, Media & Entertainment at EMC

This summer, NBC captured history while setting standards for the future.

Building on its history covering the Olympic Games, NBC provided viewers in the United States a front row seat to the Games of the XXXI Olympiad.

Projects such as covering the Games, a 17-day live concurrent event, require the ultimate in scalable, reliable storage. NBC uses the EMC Isilon product line to store and stage video captured during these irreplaceable moments of sporting glory, as well as audio, stills and motion graphics.

Isilon’s 3 Petabyte storage repository bridges the gap from Stamford to Rio, where it functioned as a single large Data Lake, enabling real-time global collaborative production supporting the entire broadcast. Adding Isilon nodes without downtime allows the addition of storage capacity and network throughput while maintaining seamless access to a rock solid platform.

NBC selected the EMC Isilon product line as a reliable, proven infrastructure, to manage their storage.

 

 

MLBAM Goes Over the Top: The Case for a DIY Approach to OTT

James Corrigan

Advisory Solutions Architect at EMC

Latest posts by James Corrigan (see all)

smart tvWhen looking at the current media landscape, the definition of what constitutes a “broadcaster” is undergoing a serious overhaul. Traditional linear TV might not be dead just yet, but it’s clearly having to reinvent itself in order to stay competitive amid rapidly evolving media business models and increasingly diverse content distribution platforms.

The concept of “binge watching” a TV show, for example, was non-existent only a few years ago. Media consumption towards digital and online viewership on a myriad of devices such as smartphones, tablets and PCs is on the rise. Subscription on-demand services are becoming the consumption method of choice, while broadcast-yourself platforms like Twitch and YouTube are fast becoming a popular corner stone of millennial’s viewership habits. Horowitz Research found that over 70 percent of millennials have access to an OTT SVOD service, and they are three times as likely to have an OTT SVOD service without a pay TV subscription. PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) estimates that OTT video streaming will grow to be a $10.1 billion business by 2018, up from $3.3 billion in 2013.

As a result, broadcast operators are evolving into media aggregators, and content providers are transforming into “entertainment service providers,” expanding into platforms ranging from mobile to digital to even virtual theme parks.

Building Versus Buying:

This change in media consumption requires media organizations to consider a more efficient storage compute and network infrastructure. Media organizations need flexible and agile platforms to not only expand their content libraries but also to meet the dynamic growth in the number of subscribers and how they consume and experience media and entertainment.

To successfully compete in OTT market is dependent upon the “uniqueness” of your service to the consumer , This uniqueness comes from either having unique or exclusive content, or by having a platform which is able to adapt and offer the customer more than just watching content. For the latter how you deploy your solution whether it be (1) build your own (“DIY”), (2) buy a turn-key solution or (3) take a hybrid approach, is key to success.

MLBAM Hits a Home Run with a DIY Approach

A key advantage of the “DIY” approach is that it increases business agility, allowing media organizations to adapt and change, as consumers demand more from their services. For some media organizations this  allows them to leverage existing content assets, infrastructure and technology teams and keep deployment costs low. Further, layering OTT video delivery on top of regular playout enables organizations to incrementally add the new workflow to the existing content delivery ecosystem. For new entrants,  the DIY approach enables  new development methodologies, allowing these “new kids on the block” to develop micro-services unencumbered by legacy services.

One example of an organization taking the DIY approach is Isilon customer Major League Baseball Advanced Media (MLBAM), which has created a streaming media empire. MLBAM’s success underscores the voracious and rapid growth in consumer demand for streaming video; it streams sporting events, and also supports the streaming service HBO GO, as well as mobile, web and TV offerings for the NHL.

“The reality is that now we’re in a situation where digital distribution isn’t just a ‘nice to have’ strategy, it’s an essential strategy for any content company,” said Joe Inzerillo, CTO for MLBAM. “When I think about…how we’re going to be able to innovate, I often tell people ‘I don’t manage technology, I actually manage velocity.’ The ability to adapt and innovate and move forward is absolutely essential.”

Alternatively, the turn-key approach, which either outsources your media platform or gives you a pre-built video delivery infrastructure, can offer benefits such as increased speed-to-market. However, selecting the right outsource partner for this approach is critical; you choose incorrectly and it can create vendor lock-in, loss of control and flexibility and larger operational costs.

Making it Personal: Analytics’ Role

3D smart tv with hand holding remote control isolatedBeing able to access content when and where consumer’s want – on the device they want – is one part of the challenge with the rise of digital and online content. Another key component is personalization of that content to viewers. Making content more relevant and tailored for subscribers is critical to the success of alternate broadcast business models – EMC and Pivotal are helping media companies extract insights on customers through the development and use of analytics should be key to any OTT strategy. Analyzing data on what consumers are watching should be used to help drive content acquisition and personalized recommendation engines. The added benefits of personalized advertisement of content through targeted ad insertion will help increase revenue through tailored advertisements.

Scaling for the future

Infrastructure platforms that scale is the final consideration for the new age media platforms. Being able to scale “apps” based on containers or virtual instances is key. To do that you need a platform that scales compute, network and storage independently or together, just like EMC’s scale out NAS with Isilon or scale out compute with VCE or VXRail/Rack. MLBAM’s Inzerillo explains. “The ability to have a technology like Isilon that’s flexible, so that the size of the data lake can grow as we on board clients, is increasingly important to us. That kind of flexibility allows you to really focus on total cost of ownership of the custodianship of the data.”

Inzerillo continues, “If you’re always worried about the sand that you’re standing on, because it’s shifting, you’re never going to be able to jump, and  what we need to be able to do is sprint.”

It’s an exciting time to be in the ever-evolving media and entertainment space – the breadth of offerings that broadcasters and media companies are developing today, and the range of devices and distribution models to reach subscribers will only continue to grow.

Check out how MLBAM improves customer experience through OTT.

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