Posts Tagged ‘NAS’

Converged Infrastructure + Isilon: Better Together

David Noy

VP Product Management, Emerging Technologies Division at EMC

You can’t beat Isilon for simplicity, scalability, performance and savings. We’re talking  world-class scale-out NAS that stores, manages, protects and analyzes your unstructured data with a powerful platform that stays simple, no matter how large your data environment. And Dell EMC already has the #1 converged infrastructure with blocks and racks. So bringing these two superstars together into one converged system is truly a case of one plus one equals three.

This convergence—pairing Vblock/VxBlock/VxRack systems and the Technology Extension for Isilon— creates an unmatched combination that flexibly supports a wide range of workloads with ultra-high performance, multi-protocol NAS storage. And the benefits really add up, too:

As impressive as these numbers are, it all boils down to value and versatility. These converged solutions give you more value for your investment because, quite simply, they store more data for less. And their versatility allows you to optimally run both traditional and nontraditional workloads These include video surveillance, SAP/Oracle/Microsoft applications, mixed workloads that generate structured and unstructured data, Electronic Medical Records and Medical Imaging and more – on infrastructure built and supported as one product.

With a Dell EMC Converged System, you’ll see better, faster business outcomes through simpler IT across a wide range of application workloads. For more information on modernizing your data center with the industry’s broadest converged portfolio, visit emc.com/ci or call your Dell EMC representative today.

 

Learn more about Converged Infrastructure and IsilonAlso, check out the full infographic

When It Comes To Data, Isolation Is The Enemy Of Insights

Brandon Whitelaw

Senior Director of Global Sales Strategy for Emerging Technologies Division at Dell EMC

Latest posts by Brandon Whitelaw (see all)

Within IT, data storage, servers and virtualization, there have always been ebbs and flows of consolidation and deconsolidation. You had the transition from terminals to PCs and now we’re going back to virtual desktops – it flows back and forth from centralized to decentralized. It’s also common to see IT trends repeat themselves.

dataIn the mid to late 90s, the major trend was to consolidate structured data sources into a single platform; to go from direct detached storage with dedicated servers per application to a consolidated central storage piece, called a storage array network (SAN). SANs allowed organizations to go from a shared nothing architecture (SN) to a shared everything architecture (SE), where you have a single point of control, allowing users to share available resources and not have data trapped or siloed within the independent direct detached storage systems.

The benefit of consolidation has been an ongoing IT trend that continues to repeat itself on a regular basis, whether it’s storage, servers or networking. What’s interesting is once you consolidate all the data sources, IT is able to finally look at doing more with them. The consolidation onto a SAN enables cross analysis of data sources that were otherwise previously isolated from each other. This was simply practically infeasible to do before. Now that these sources are in one place, this enables the emergence of systems such as an enterprise data warehouse, which is the concept of ingesting and transforming all the data on a common scheme to allow for reporting and analysis. Companies embracing this process led to growth in IT consumption because of the value gained from that data. It also led to new insights, resulting in most of the world’s finance, strategy, accounting, operations and sales groups all relying on the data they get from these enterprise data warehouses.

Next, companies started giving employees PCs, and what do you do on PCs? Create files. Naturally, the next step is to ask, “How do I share these files?” and “How do I collaborate on these files?” The end result is home directories and file shares. From an infrastructure perspective, there needed to be a shared common platform for this data to come together. Regular PCs can’t talk to a SAN without direct block level access, a fiber channel, or being connected in the data center to a server, so unless you want everyone to physically sit in the data center, you run Ethernet.

Businesses ended up building Windows file servers to be the middleman brokering the data between the users on Ethernet and the backend SAN. This method worked until companies reached the point where the Windows file servers steadily grew to dozens. Yet again, this led to IT teams being left with complexity, inefficiency and facing the original problem of having several isolated silos of data and multiple different points of management.

So what’s the solution? Let’s take the middleman out of this. Let’s take the file system that was sitting on top of the file servers and move it directly onto the storage system and allow Ethernet to go directly to it. Thus the network-attached storage (NAS) was born.

However, continuing the cycle, what started as a single NAS eventually became dozens for organizations. Each NAS device contained specific applications with different performance characteristics and protocol access. Also, each system could only store so much data before it didn’t have enough performance to keep up, so systems would continue expanding and replicating to accommodate.

This escalates until an administrator is startled to realize 80 percent of his/her company’s data being created is unstructured. The biggest challenge of unstructured data is that it’s not confined to the four walls of a data center. Once again, we find ourselves with silos that aren’t being shared (notice the trend repeating itself?). Ultimately, this creates the need for scale-out architecture with multiprotocol data access that can combine and consolidate unstructured data sources to optimize collaboration.

Doubling every two years, unstructured data is the vast majority of all data being created. Traditionally, the approach to gaining insights from this data has involved building yet another silo, which prevents having a single source of istock_000048860836_largetruth and having your data in one place. Due to the associated cost and the complexity, not all of the data goes into a data lake, for instance, but only sub-samples of the data that are relevant to that individual query. An option to ending this particular cycle is investing in a storage system that not only has the protocol access and tiering capabilities to consolidate all your unstructured data sources, but can also serve as your analytics platform. Therefore your primary storage, the single source of truth that comes with it and that ease of management will lend itself to become that next phase, which is unlocking its insights.

Storing data is typically viewed as a red-ink line item, but it can actually be to your benefit. Not because of regulation or policies dictating it, but as a deeper, wider set of data that can provide better answers. Often, you may not know what questions to ask until you’re able to see data sets together. Consider the painting technique, pointillism. If you look too closely, it’s just a bunch of dots of paint. However, if you stand back, a landscape emerges, ladies with umbrellas materialize and suddenly you realize you’re staring at Georges Seurat’s famous panting, A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte. Similar to pointillism, with data analytics, you never think of connecting the dots if you don’t even realize they’re next to one another.

EMC World 2013, Day 1

Sam Grocott

Senior Vice President, Marketing & Product Management at EMC ETD

Welcome to EMC World 2013, all. Yesterday, we kicked off the biggest and most social EMC World ever with the ViPR announcement—EMC’s software-defined storage solution. The buzz continued throughout the day with EVP Jeremy Burton and President & COO David Goulden’s keynote on software-defined storage, where they highlighted ViPR, EMC Isilon, and Syncplicity to name a few.

ViPR

In the Solutions Pavilion, we had the grand unveiling of this year’s fully decked-out EMC Isilon booth, featuring Captain Scale-Out and his team of data storage superheroes.

Isilon Booth at EMC World 2013

Stop by our fortress of scale-out for giveaways, sessions, and ongoing conversations about everything Isilon. We’re handing out t-shirts to those who come and weigh their big data and you can register to win a 3D printer; the winner will be announced during Bill Richter’s Wednesday keynote. We’ll also be demo-ing Hadoop and OneFS, and offering sneak peeks into the VCE Vblock with Isilon for file archiving.

If you’re here in Las Vegas with us, please drop by to say hello. If you were unable to make this year’s show, stream EMC World live here

Be sure to follow us on Twitter at @EMCIsilon and Facebook  for real-time updates and photos. Check back for recaps of Day 2 and 3 of EMC World 2013, and stay tuned for more scale-out news! This is just the beginning.

In the meantime, tell us—how are you leading your transformation?

Categories

Archives

Connect with us on Twitter